Holiday Baking with Maple Syrup or Sugar

The holidays are a time for family and friends, to reflect on the year that is almost passed and the potential for the new year ahead. The holiday season wouldn’t be complete, however, without the delicious smells of home cooking wafting through the house. In our homes, we enjoy finding new ways to use maple syrup or granulated maple sugar in our holiday cooking and especially baking this time of year. The unique flavor of maple syrup lifts almost any baked good to new heights and substituting maple syrup or maple sugar in place of white or brown sugar is easy — see our handy chart below for more information. If you’re baking this holiday season, try a couple of our favorites recipes and post on our Facebook page to let us know how they turn out!

MapleSnickedoodleFull

 

 

 

Try our Maple Snickerdoodles for a Vermont twist on a classic cookie.

 

 

 

Maple Coconut Cookies

 

 

 

Or try a Maple Coconut Cookie for a not-too-sweet but delicious treat!

 

 

Maybe you need a quick breakfast item  for guests during the holidays? Try our Cranberry Ginger Maple Muffins or our Pumpkin Maple Muffins.

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Cran-Ginger Maple Muffins

PumpkinMapleforBlog

Pumpkin Maple Muffins

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How to Substitute White Sugar with Maple Syrup or Maple Sugar:

Maple syrup can be used in place of white sugar in most recipes and is a delicious way to liven up an old favorite by bringing maple’s unique flavor to a dish.  Better still, it’s also a healthy way to sweeten your food and beverages as maple syrup is high in healthful antioxidants and naturally includes essential minerals such as calcium, magnesium, potassium, and manganese.  It’s more nutritious than other common sweeteners such as corn syrup, honey, or white sugar; contains one of the lowest calorie levels; and has been shown to have healthy glycemic qualities.

To begin using maple syrup in place of the usual white sugar, it’s helpful to keep a few pointers in mind.  If using maple syrup, for each cup of sugar a recipe calls for, use ¾ cup of maple syrup and reduce the other liquids by ¼ cup.  Using granulated maple sugar is even easier as that can be substituted 1:1 in any recipe.

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